Working Papers

Why a Policy Bubble is Sustainable: The Role of Institutional Context
November 2016

This conceptual paper suggests a crucial revision to the policy bubble agenda, wherein some bubbles may emerge within institutional settings which support efforts by policy entrepreneurs to advance and correct distorted policy valuations (I have termed them preference-driven policy bubbles), whereas others emerge in settings which inhibit efforts to advance and/or correct the distortion (I have termed them institution--driven policy bubbles). Institutional restrictions on the visibility of the policy domain and on the voicing of dissent may lead to stronger and more sustainable distorted policy valuations, and thereby, to relatively stable and self-sustaining policy bubbles. The lack of such restrictions may lead to weaker and less sustainable distorted policy valuations and, thereby, to relatively fragile policy bubbles.

Key Words: policy bubbles, comparison, valuation, accountability, transparency



Emotion Regulation by Emotional Entrepreneurs: Implications for Political Science and International Relations
June 2015

Despite robust evidence that emotions can have a powerful impact on public opinion, political behavior, and foreign policy, few studies have directly addressed the possibility that emotions may be strategically regulated by political and policy actors. To systematically examine the role of emotion regulation in domestic and global political domains, what is needed is a framework for organizing the large number of regulatory strategies available to actors who wish to influence others’ emotions in pursuit of their goals. One such framework is Gross’s (2014) process model of emotion regulation, which previously has been used primarily to examine psychological processes at the individual level in healthy and clinical populations. We use this framework to present an overview of the emerging field of emotion regulation by emotional entrepreneurs at the local, state, national and global levels, to identify gaps in the relevant literatures in political science and international relations, and to propose a research agenda which revolves around whether different emotion regulation strategies and implementation tactics have different political consequences, both immediately and over the long term.

Key Words: Emotion Regulation, Emotional Entrepreneurs, Opinion Formation, Political Behavior, Social Movements, Public Policy